Concertato: Chamber Music by Lydia Kakabadse

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Catalogue No: DDA 25149
EAN/UPC: 809730514920
Artists:
Composers:
Release Date: February 2017
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Discs: 1

British composer Lydia Kakabadse (with roots in Greece, Austria, Russia and Georgia) reflects her cultural heritage in music that has western and mid-Asian elements – while this is strongest in her choral music, it is heard to good effect in her chamber works, which are often written in modal intonation; her first chamber CD was issued by Naxos to good reviews and this set concentrates on the ‘alternative’ string quartet line-up with double bass, with one piece for cello and bass duo and one for mezzo-soprano and quartet. The title ‘Concertato’ derives from the usage in baroque music meaning a rivalry or contrast between the instruments; the composer uses this to emphasis lines and dialogues between instruments, especially so in the cello/bass duo which gives the CD its name.

Sound collective is a group of distinguished musicians which works closely with composers, writers and educators in order to build new ways of appreciating and promoting chamber music.

Performers: Jess Dandy (mezzo-soprano); Sara Trickey (violin); Sarah-Jane Bradley (viola); Tim Lowe (cello); Ben Griffiths (double bass)

Track Listing

    Lydia Kakabadse:

  1. I. The Coachman’s Terror − I. Snow Storms Gather (2:55)
  2. II. The Coachman’s Terror − II. Stranded amidst Swirling Snows (2:34)
  3. III. The Coachman’s Terror − III. Evil Spirits Gather Round (4:29)
  4. IV. The Coachman’s Terror − IV. A Landscape so Desolate (3:37)
  5. V. The Coachman’s Terror − V. Straying into the Unknown (4:30)
  6. I. Dance Sketches − I. Arabian Folk Dance (3:39)
  7. II. Dance Sketches − II. Stately Court Dance (4:05)
  8. III. Dance Sketches − III. Dance of the Clockwork Toys (2:17)
  9. I. Concertato − I. Andante espressione (2:46)
  10. II. Concertato − II. Andante legato (2:31)
  11. III. Concertato − III. Andante con brio (2:49)
  12. IV. Concertato − IV. Andante energico (3:23)
  13. I. Two Chamber Songs − I. Spellbound (2:21)
  14. II. Two Chamber Songs − II. Eldorado (3:19)
  15. I. Cantus Planus − I. Matins (3:56)
  16. II. Cantus Planus − II. Lauds (3:45)
  17. III. Cantus Planus − III. Vespers (4:25)
  18. I. Recitativo Arioso + Variations − I. Recitativo Arioso (4:32)
  19. II. Recitativo Arioso + Variations − II. First Variation (2:22)
  20. III. Recitativo Arioso + Variations − III. Second Variation (4:14)

Reviews

Tamvakos Archive

I listened to this superb CD several times and each time I discovered something new and even better. This music is magnificent and goes straight to the heart. All in all, an exceptional album of heavenly music. I highly recommend it as one of the best CD’s of the decade.

” —Tomas Tamvakos
American Record Guide

Most of [this music] is for violin, viola, cello & double bass—an interesting combination. The two songs … are sung with beauty by Jess Dandy and accompanied by the quartet. It is distinctly influenced by styles of the Renaissance and seems almost totally modal. These musicians of the Sound Collective play it with beauty of tone and conviction.

” —David W. Moore
Audiophile Sound

This recording, which collects together several of her chamber works, is a useful calling card to introduce her in our country. The works here boast styles recalling the musical traditions of the Middle East and Greece, there are also occasional flashes of the minimalism of Steve Reich and Philip Glass, and they show great attention to spirituality. The interpretation by the four members of Sound Collective or the mezzo-soprano Jess Dandy gives nothing to criticize. Spatially, reproduction is good with an airy, fast sound for this deep quartet.

” —Andrea Bedetti
MusicWeb International

This unusual quartet [with double bass] immediately creates a distinctive sound world, with a rich, lower-string sound. The music instantly has an originality of tone, and there are moments of particular beauty. The influence of medieval music is evident throughout. Performances throughout are admirable, and there is tremendous pleasure to be gained from this music. More, please!

” —Michael Wilkinson
Zookeepr Online, Stanford University

Lydia Kakabadse is a British composer who combines her Greek/Russian heritage with strong contrapuntal technique. This CD’s works, composed from 2004 to 2016 utilize traditional harmonies and are melodic.Recitativo + Variations …displays the composer’s ability to create counterpoint and color treatment of her lyrical idea.

” —Gary Lemco
Tamvakos Archive

I listened to this superb CD several times and each time I discovered something new and even better. This music is magnificent and goes straight to the heart. All in all, an exceptional album of heavenly music. I highly recommend it as one of the best CD’s of the decade.

” —Tomas Tamvakos
American Record Guide

Most of [this music] is for violin, viola, cello & double bass—an interesting combination. The two songs … are sung with beauty by Jess Dandy and accompanied by the quartet. It is distinctly influenced by styles of the Renaissance and seems almost totally modal. These musicians of the Sound Collective play it with beauty of tone and conviction.

” —David W. Moore
Pizzicato

Lydia Kakabadse’s Russian/Georgian as well as Greek/Austrian descent, enriched by Arabian and medieval ideas, give birth to a an inspiring music mix. The Ensemble ‘sound collective’ as well as singer Jess Dandy prove committed and high-class performers.

” —Uwe Krusch
The Chronicle

This charming album is already one of our favourites. Kakabadse is British but has roots in Greece, Austria, Russia and Georgia, and it’s the mixture of cultures that gives this its charm. The music comes from Sound Collective, a group of musicians that works with composers, writers and educators to build new ways of appreciating and promoting chamber music. They’ve certainly succeeded with this.

” —Jeremy Condliffe
Records International

Instantly accessible, genteel and well-crafted works. [An] air of sombre reflection, expressed in a melodic, neo-romantic vocabulary, pervades most of the works on the disc. The string quartet lineup, while used conventionally, is afforded additional depth of timbre by the substitution of contrabass for second violin.

” —anonymous