The Expressive Voice of the Flute

$17.00$24.00

Clear

Among the instruments, the flute is one which has one of the widest expressive tones, especially heard to advantage in this collection of 46 light classics, ranging from the dreamy and romantic to the lively and sparkling. Original works are joined by many arrangements of popular orchestral or piano pieces, many by the performers. A feast of virtuosity and superb for both concentrated listening or lightening the mood. Over 145 minutes of great music. This set is a sequel to ‘Flute Vocalise’ (DDV24156) another fine collection (single CD midprice).

Some tracks on this set were previously available on ASV and have been remastered and new recordings added.

Track Listing

    Ralph Vaughan Williams:

  1. Fantasia on Greensleeves (5:12)
  2. Edward Elgar:

  3. Chanson de Matin (3:32)
  4. Edward Elgar:

  5. La Capricieuse (4:40)
  6. Howard Blake:

  7. Make Believe (3:36)

Reviews

American Record Guide

Kenneth Smith’s sound is ravishingly beautiful, and he always plays with accuracy and imagination. Paul Rhodes’s accompani­ments are skillful, sensitive, and perfectly timed. The booklet includes a few words about each selection plus information on publishers. The cover art, a close-up of light blue delphini­um flowers, is almost as lovely as the playing inside.

” —Todd Gorman
Tempo Flute

A programme … in which the musicality and freshness are joined in the simple pleasures of an auditory adventure. The French listener will discover here many titles popular across the Channel in Britain to his grand satisfaction.

” —Pascal Gresset
Pan -The Flute Magazine

The playing is a pleasure to listen to, with beautifully even tone, a wide palette of colours, and flawless intonation, accompanied sensitively by Paul Rhodes. This is a most enjoyable compilation, beautifully played.

” —Daniel Shao
Fanfare

Flutist Kenneth Smith and pianist Paul Rhodes give a two-disc recital that contains some of the most calming music imaginable. Their arrangements are enthralling and they convey the meanings of [the originally vocal] pieces without reference to their texts. The sound on the recording is clear and present with the flute in front of the piano.

” —Maria Nockin