Letters to the World – Chamber Music by George Nicholson

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Catalogue No: MSVCD 92062
EAN/UPC: 5019148628132
Composers:
Release Date: November 2000
Genres: ,
Periods:
Discs: 1
Total Playing Time: 79:27
Sample: "Answer July" from Letters to the World

George Nicholson says that he is always alert to the challenge of working with the grain of every instrument he writes for, exploring and exploiting its potential to the full. As a result his music makes virtuoso demands on the players. His style is eclectic drawing on many genres (including jazz scat-singing in “For Miles”) making it full of interest.

Track Listing

    George Nicholson:

  1. 1. Spring Songs – No. 1 (1:25)
  2. II. Spring Songs – No. 2 (1:46)
  3. III. Spring Songs – No. 3 (3:24)
  4. IV. Spring Songs – No. 4 (2:02)
  5. V. Spring Songs – No. 5 (2:42)
  6. I. Three Pieces from Mots Justes – 1. For Miles (5:56)
  7. II. Three Pieces from Mots Justes – 2. Sung without words (5:36)
  8. III. Three Pieces from Mots Justes – 3. In accord (12:55)
  9. Nodus (10:44)
  10. I. Letters to the World – 1. Belshazzar had a letter (2:06)
  11. II. Letters to the World – 2. Of Yellow was the Outer Sky (4:07)
  12. III. Letters to the World – 3. Answer July (1:16)
  13. IV. Letters to the World – 4. There is a solitude of space (3:14)
  14. V. Letters to the World – 5. Yesterday is History (1:29)
  15. VI. Letters to the World – 6. As imperceptibly as grief (6:12)
  16. VII. Letters to the World – 7. Bee! I’m expecting you (2:37)
  17. VIII. Letters to the World – 8. Heart! We will forget him (2:45)
  18. IX. Letters to the World – 9. He scanned it (2:43)
  19. X. Letters to the World – 10. A death blow is a life blow to some (3:26)
  20. XI. Letters to the World – 11. The wind didn’t come from the orchard (2:31)

Reviews

MusicWeb

[Nicholson’s] music, as heard here, is always beautifully crafted, technically demanding, certainly not easy to play but eminently accessible for the composer always sees to it that it communicates directly by way of its invention, its imagination and its vitality.

” —Hubert Culot